What we do

 

What we do

In ADA Scotland:

  • We run courses to train describers in audio description skills
  • We encourage the development of new skills in audio description through sharing best practice
  • We monitor the quality of audio description broadcasts
  • We offer training for venue staff in the welcome and safe guiding of patrons with a sight problem
  • We offer advice to theatres, museums, galleries, arts, sports and heritage centres on the
    provision and marketing of audio description
  • We loan portable radio equipment to members which can be used in schools, at open air events, festivals and private functions – see below
  • We hold a register of accredited audio describers in Scotland which is made available to Corporate Members (available from the acting secretary) at enquiries@adascotland.com
  • We produce a regular newsletter circulated around all members of the Association
  • We provide speakers to inform the public about audio description
  • We offer refresher workshops in guiding, writing introductions, touch tours and audio description protocol to our members
  • We offer workshops in specialist areas e.g. dance
  • We provide a liaison point for describers, visually impaired people and theatres
  • We can provide audio description at conferences: Fees by negotiation. Please contact enquiries@adascotland.com for further information.

Equipment loan

ADA Scotland’s broadcasting equipment can be used by members.
To book the portable radio equipment contact:

Kim McKenna
Festival City Theatres
13 Nicolson Street
Edinburgh
EH8 9FT
0131 662 1112
Kim.McKenna@edtheatres.com

One set consists of 20 lightweight headsets using rechargeable batteries, plus one microphone, in a compact flight case. The microphone requires one 9 volt battery per three hour show. Before use, the headset batteries must be charged on full boost for 24 hours. You must therefore allow for this when calculating the dates for which you will require the equipment, giving at least three days’ notice.

A second set has twenty-nine receivers with headphones but the receivers can also be used with a universal jack so the visually impaired person can provide their own earpiece if they wish.

Photo of old microphone

audio description icon